Tuesday, 30 November 1999 00:00

Thai Butternut Squash Soup

Thai Butternut Squash Soup


Share member Melissa Pasanen sent this recipe along a couple weeks ago after receiving the last round of pumpkin puree in the share. The puree makes soups like this a breeze! Assuming you want keep your precious mesclun for salad, you can skip the greens if you don't have anything appropriate in your fridge. But if you don't think you will make salad this week, you could add a few handfuls of your spinach/claytonia mix. This one has been adapted from Simple Suppers from Moosewood.

1 cup coconut milk (or 1 whole can)
1/2 teaspoon Thai red curry paste, or to taste
4 teaspoons sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups vegetable broth
24 ounces cooked winter squash (the whole 32 oz bag will be fine!)
1 lime
2 cups fresh baby spinach or bok choy leaves, thinly slivered
chopped fresh cilantro

Whisk coconut milk, curry paste, sugar, salt, broth, squash together in a large pot. Cover and bring to simmer and cook 10 minutes or so until heated through. Lightly grate lime and add 1 teaspoon zest and juice of lime. Add spinach or bok choy and cook just until wilted. Adjust seasoning to taste. Serve with cilantro as desired. Serves 4.

Published in Soups and Stews
Tuesday, 30 November 1999 00:00

VT Pasta Linguine Three Ways

VT Pasta Linguine Three Ways


Of course there are endless ways to dress up your VT Pasta linguine. The sauce will likely take you longer to make than the pasta itself, so with this lovely fresh pasta have everything else ready before dropping the pasta in the pot. To cook the pasta, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil, then put in the thawed or frozen pasta. Bring the water back to a boil for 1-2 minutes. Then immediately drain the pasta, transfer back to the cooking pot, stir in your chosen additions, and serve.
1. Butter and Parmesan - For simplicity, to let the pasta flavor shine through, this is the way to go. After draining the pasta, simply transfer to a bowl and add a knob of butter and some shaved parmesan.

2. Sundried Tomato, Olive and Garlic
Put a TB or so of olive oil in a pan and add 10 -20 chopped kalamata olives, a few chopped sundried tomatoes and 2-3 cloves of minced garlic (and a sprinkling of crushed red pepper if you want some spice). Heat gently til fragrant. Remove from heat and add to pasta coating the pasta well (add a bit more olive oil if necessary). Finish off with some grated parmesan and serve.

3. Butternut Squash Sauce and Braising Greens over Linguine
1-2 TB butter or oil
half a small onion, sliced thin
pinch of sugar
1-2 cloves of garlic
a few leaves of sage
2 cups of squash puree
1/4 cup braising greens

For this one, saute a small onion in the pan in a TB or two of butter or olive oil with a pinch of sugar til very soft. Add in 3 cloves of minced garlic and a few leaves of sage if you have them in the last several minutes, and do not let the garlic brown. Add 2-3 cups of squash puree plus 1/4 bag of braising greens and heat through. Finally, add 1/2 cup of parmesan to the sauce. Taste to adjust seasonings and then combine with your pasta. Add more grated parm t finish the dish if you like.

Published in Pastas
Tuesday, 30 November 1999 00:00

Butternut Squash-Parsnip Soup with Thyme

Butternut Squash-Parsnip Soup with Thyme


In case you still have parsnips in your veggie drawer leftover from last week (I know I didn't offer up a recipe last week).... This one is from Bon Appetit October 1997.

2 tablespoons butter
1 2-pound butternut squash, unpeeled, halved lengthwise, seeded, cut into 8 pieces
1 pound parsnips, peeled, cut crosswise into 2-inch pieces, thick end pieces cut lengthwise in half
1/4 cup water
1 onion, halved, thinly sliced
2 teaspoons minced fresh thyme or 3/4 teaspoon dried
4 cups canned low-salt chicken broth
1 cup half and half

In a pot of boiling water, simmer parsnips til tender. Meanwhile, melt 2 tablespoons butter in heavy large skillet over medium-low heat. Add onion and thyme; sauté until onion is tender and golden, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat.

Puree onion mixture and parsnips until smooth using a food processor or a potato masher if you don't mind some lumps in your soup. Mix in broth and squash puree.

Transfer mixture to heavy large saucepan. Whisk in half and half (you can substitute whole or even low fat milk here if you lke). Bring to simmer. Season with salt and pepper. (Can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Rewarm before serving.)

Published in Soups and Stews
Tuesday, 30 November 1999 00:00

Winter Squash Sage Pasta Sauce

Winter Squash Sage Pasta Sauce


One of the farm team, Steve Schimoler, has been toying with this sauce for pasta using the winter squash puree. The amounts in the recipe below are a best guess sort of guideline. He's made this a few times and has not exactly been measuring. But when in doubt - taste!

1 Qt winter squash puree (thawed)
1 small onion, minced
1/4 - 1/2 stick butter
1 clove garlic
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh sage (or 1 tsp dried)
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 to 1 cup Cream, or Craime Fraiche
(and/or 2 oz finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano (1 cup))

plus additional Parmigiano-Reggiano for serving

Bring a large pot of water to boil to cook your pasta in and cook your pasta according to directions.

Meanwhile, in a second large sauce pot over medium high heat melt the butter, and cook the onions and garlic until they are soft. Then add the sage and stir for about 15 seconds until fragrant. Then add squash, salt and pepper and heat through. Add cream or craime fraiche or the cheese at the very end. Mix the drained cooked pasta with the sauce, stirring gently to coat the pasta with the sauce. Serve topped with additional Parmigiano-Reggiano.

We have featured a couple recipes for Thai inspired Winter Squash soups that are so easy to make with this squash puree. They plus other recipes are available on Pete's blog. Take a look:



Tuesday, 30 November 1999 00:00

Winter Vegetable Tart

Winter Vegetable Tart


This recipe was brought to my attention by share member Stacy Fraser who has been making it over and over again all winter using lots of different combinations of roots and things she has received in the share. It's very adaptable, you could use really any root veg combo, you could throw in some frozen red peppers and experiment with different cheeses. It's from the Edible Green Mountains website where you can find lots of great recipes (including one for Dark Chocolate Bread Pudding with Whiskey Caramel Sauce which has nothing to do with this week's share ingredients and which I now can't get off my mind). If you haven't got a go to recipe for pie crust, try this one I posted to the blog Nov. 24th. It's pretty dependable.

1 pound butternut squash (1 small), peeled, seeded and diced into 1⁄2-inch cubes beets, peeled and diced into 1⁄2-inch cubes
2 cups sliced mushrooms
1 onion, halved and cut into slivers
1 red bell pepper, diced (optional)
6 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
pie crust for one 9- or 10-inch pie
1⁄2 pound Fontina cheese, grated

Preheat the oven to 425°F. Lightly oil a large shallow roast- ing pan or half sheet pan.
In a large bowl, combine the squash, beets, mushrooms, onion, bell pepper, if using, and garlic. Add the olive oil, rosemary and salt and pepper to taste. Toss to coat well. Transfer to the pan and arrange in a shallow (preferably single) layer.

Roast for 35 to 45 minutes, until the vegetables are tender and lightly browned, stirring or shaking the pan occasionally for even cooking. Remove the vegetables from the oven and reduce the oven temperature to 375°F.
Line a baking sheet with foil. Place the pastry on the bak- ing sheet. Sprinkle the cheese over the pastry, leaving a 2-inch border around the edge. Arrange the roasted vegetables on top of the cheese. Fold the dough up to partially cover the filling and crimp to seal the edges.

Bake for about 25 minutes, until the crust is golden. Cut into wedges and serve warm.

Published in Dinner
Tuesday, 30 November 1999 00:00

Butternut Squash Bread

Butternut Squash Bread


I like that this recipe calls for many ingredients you have recently received. And that it sounds rich and delicious!

2 (.25 ounce) packages active dry yeast
1/2 cup warm water (110 degrees F to 115 degrees F)
1 1/4 cups butternut squash puree
1 cup warm milk (110 to 115 degrees F)
2 eggs, beaten
1/2 cup sunfower oil
1/3 cup honey, maple syrup, or agave
1 teaspoon salt
7 cups all-purpose flour (or a mix of flours)

In a mixing bowl, dissolve yeast in water; let stand for 5 minutes. Add squash, milk, eggs, oils, syrup and salt; mix well. Gradually add 3-1/2 cups flour; beat until smooth. Add enough remaining flour to form a soft dough. Turn onto a floured surface; knead until smooth and elastic, about 6-8 minutes. Place in a greased bowl, turning once to grease top. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 hour. Punch dough down. Shape into three loaves; place in greased 8-in. x 4-in. x 2-in. loaf pans. Cover and let rise until doubled, about 30 minutes. Bake at 375 degrees F for 25-30 minutes or until tops are golden. Remove from pans to cool on wire racks.

Published in Baked Goods
Tuesday, 30 November 1999 00:00

South American Butternut Bisque

South American Butternut Bisque



3 tablespoons butter
1 onion, chopped
1 tomato, peeled, seeded, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 red chili, seeded, chopped
2 pounds winter squash peeled, cut into 1/2 cubes such as butternut or acorn
4 cups vegetable stock
salt to taste
freshly ground black pepper to taste
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1 bunch parsley or cilantro, washed and finely chopped

Saute onions, tomato, garlic, and hot peppers in the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat until the onion is softened and the mixture is thick, about 15 minutes. Stir in the squash and the stock and simmer. Reduce heat, stir in salt and sugar, then simmer, covered, for 10 minutes. Turn of heat and stir in cilantro or parsley. Garnish with dollop of sour cream or yogurt.

Published in Soups and Stews
Tuesday, 30 November 1999 00:00

Savory Squash & Chard Pie

Savory Squash & Chard Pie



1 pkg. Frozen filo dough
2 lbs. squash puree, completely defrosted, drained through sieve
2 onions, thinly sliced
2 teaspoons kosher salt
5 tbsp. olive oil, plus extra for brushing the filo
1 tbsp. finely chopped ginger
1 tsp. ground cumin
1/4 tsp. ground cinnamon
1/4 cup fresh cilantro, rough chop
1/4 tsp. black pepper
1/3 cup raisins
1/4 cup walnut pieces
2 garlic cloves, chopped
1 bunch chard, large stems removed

Preheat the oven to 425°F. Defrost filo for about one hour prior to start.

Once the puree is completely defrosted and drained, heat oil in a large sauté pan and add onions and cook until translucent. Add puree and cook down until well incorporated and excess liquid is evaporated. Add salt, ginger, cumin, cinnamon, cilantro, pepper, raisins and walnuts and set aside. In another pan, heat some oil and add garlic. just barely cooking. Add chard and wilt. Place chard and garlic mixture in a colander and push excess liquid out.

Brush a 9 x13-inch baking dish with olive oil. Unroll the pastry sheets so that they lie flat. Lay one sheet of filo in the dish crosswise so that it covers about half of the bottom, and half of the sheet hangs over the side facing you. Brush the part that covers the bottom with olive oil. Now lay a second sheet along the right-hand side of the dish, overlapping the first sheet in the middle of the dish and overhanging the side facing you. Brush with olive oil. Repeat with 2 more sheets but this time arranges them in the dish so that they overhang the other long side of the dish (at the top). Continue in the same way until you've used 14 sheets of filo.

Line the bottom of the dish with about half of the chard, using your hands to open up the leaves and spread them out. Spoon the squash mixture on top and gently flatten with the spoon. Cover with the rest of the chard. Fold one of the filo sheets over the filling and brush with oil. Fold the sheet next to it over and brush with oil. Do the same for 2 sheets on the opposing side of the dish. Continue in this way until all of the filo is folded over the filling. Then cover with 2 more sheets of filo, brushing each one.

Put the baking dish in the oven and bake until the pastry is golden brown, 30 to 35 minutes. Let stand 15 minutes before serving, or let cool to room temperature.

Published in Dinner
Tuesday, 30 November 1999 00:00

Simplest Summer Squash

Simplest Summer Squash


A very simple summer squash recipe from Molly Katzen's The Vegetable Dishes I Can’t Live Without. I really like Molly's cookbooks (The Moosewood Cookbook being the most well known of the bunch). The recipes are simple and straight forward and the results always good. Serves 3-4.

1.5 to 2 Tb olive oil
2 small or medium onions
1/8 tsp salt, possibly more
1.5 lbs. summer squash to cut into 1/2 in. thick slices
1 tsp minced garlic
salt and pepper to taste
freshy ground pepper to taste

Place a large skillet over medium heat. After a minute, add 1 Tb of the oil and swirl to coat the pan. Add the onions and salt. Cook, stirring often for about 10 minutes or until the onions are tender and lightly browned. Transfer the onions to a bowl and set aside.

Do not clean the pan and return it to medium heat. Add a little more olive oil to coat. Add the squash in a single layer and cook until golden brown. Leave them alone (or don’t stir them around) — allowing them to get golden brown. This will take a minute or two, depending on how crowded the pan is.

Scrape the squash loose and flip over (or use tongs). Continue cooking, again without stirring, another 1 to 2 minutes until deeply browned on the other side.

Toss in the garlic and cook for another 1 to 2 minutes. Add the onions to the pan. Mix well and season with salt and a good amount of freshly ground pepper. Serve hot, warm, or at room temp, garnished if you like with a light sprinkling of thyme and some cheese (parm, feta or try the Landaff!)

Published in Light Sides
Tuesday, 30 November 1999 00:00

BRAISED SQUASH WITH INDIAN SPICES

BRAISED SQUASH WITH INDIAN SPICES


3 # winter squash, peeled and cubed
1/4 c oil
1 onion, diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 inch piece fresh ginger, minced
1 tsp each cumin, coriander
1/2 tsp turmeric
1 tbsp black mustard seeds
1 tsp red pepper flakes
1 tsp salt, to taste
1 c water
1 tomato, diced (frozen works great)
3 tbsp maple syrup
1 tsp garam masala (cardamom, cinnamon, cumin, cloves, black pepper blend)
Chopped cilantro for garnish, optional
Heat oil in a dutch oven and sauté onion, garlic, ginger, spices and mustard seeds. Cook until the seeds start to pop around. Add the salt, water, tomato maple syrup and squash. Simmer until squash is tender, covered for the first 15 minutes. Stir in the garam masala and cilantro, mashing the squash a bit if you’d like.
Adapted from The New American Cooking
And the kohlrabi, what to do with those big green or purple orbs? In the Farmer John's Cookbook, there's a great idea for making hash browns. Peel and shred the kohlrabi as you would potatoes. Squeeze out excess moisture in a dish towel. Combine 2 eggs, 1 diced small onion, 2 tbsp bread crumbs, 1 tsp salt, 1/2 tsp ginger powder, 1/4 tsp red pepper flakes. Mix in the kohlrabi. Heat a griddle with a bit of butter. Fry up patties of the mixture, until golden brown, about 5 to 7 minutes per side.
You could also make fabulous mashed potatoes and kohlrabi. Oh, and add some sautéed leeks, too. Yum!

Published in Hearty Sides
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